Bonnie Raitt

With 'Dig In Deep', her twentieth album, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bonnie Raitt comes out swinging. The follow-up to 2012's triumphant 'Slipstream', the new record illustrates the delicate balance of consistency and risk-taking that has defined Raitt's remarkable career for more than forty-five years.

On this album, Raitt kept things focused and close to home. Feeling that her recent two-year-long tour was one of her best ever, she was eager to get her touring band back in the studio. She again produced the album herself, and notably, she has writing credits on five of the album's songs—the most original compositions she has contributed to a record since 1998's 'Fundamental'.

In many ways, 'Dig In Deep' is a continuation of a new chapter for Raitt that started with the release of 'Slipstream'. That album marked her return to studio recording after seven years and the launch of her label, Redwing Records. A huge success, 'Slipstream' sold over a quarter-million copies in 2012, making it one of the top-selling independent albums, and earned Raitt her tenth GRAMMY Award, for Best Americana Album. From the New York Times to People Magazine, 'Slipstream' was also lauded in numerous critics' lists for album of the year.

"The response to 'Slipstream' was such a refreshing and unexpected boost," she says. "So going into this album, I had renewed energy."

Raitt played over 170 shows in North America, Singapore, Australia/New Zealand, the UK and Europe on her 2012-2013 'Slipstream' Tour, made several national TV appearances (Ellen, Leno, Letterman, GMA, Fallon, Kimmel and more), performed at the 2012 Kennedy Center Honors, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Performance from the Americana Music Association.

"Coming off of the 'Slipstream' tour, it felt like finishing a winning season," says Raitt. "At that point, I just wanted to build on the band's and my strengths and find something new to dig into—and that's what the next year was all about."

The Band

George Marinelli

James "Hutch" Hutchinson

Mike Finnigan

Ricky Fataar

The recent success, and the ease that she has with her current team, also motivated Raitt to get back into songwriting mode. "I wanted to come up with some songs that went with grooves that I missed playing in my live show," she says. "Looking around at my friends and peers, a lot of them are doing some of their best work, and I found it very inspirational to get back into the pit, coming up with my own point of view again, as well as writing with my longtime bandmates, George Marinelli and Jon Cleary."

In addition to the originals, Raitt recorded material by some of her favorite working songwriters, and a couple of knock-out covers—a blazing version of Los Lobos' "Shakin' Shakin' Shakes" and her sexy, slow-burn take on the INXS hit "Need You Tonight." 'Dig In Deep' features a healthy dose of Raitt's signature slide guitar work, but also sees her at the piano for two emotional, deeply personal numbers. She also included "You've Changed My Mind," a song from the 2010 sessions she did with producer Joe Henry, four of which ended up on 'Slipstream'.

She knew going into the sessions that she would once again produce the album and use her beloved touring band—George Marinelli on guitar, James "Hutch" Hutchinson on bass, Ricky Fataar on drums, and Mike Finnigan on keyboards. She also reunited with her engineer Ryan Freeland; "Ryan has become a very strong ally," she says. "There's a great simpatico there and he's just phenomenal at what he does."

As always, there was the matter of finding the material, working out the arrangements, and then pulling out the feel of the album. "With all my records, I've never had a concept or an angle," she says. "It's more a function of finding songs that can really express what I want to say at the time, with grooves I've been wanting to add and ways of putting them together that are both fresh and challenging to us and our fans. When you get the right people in the room and don't think about it too much, that's when I think the best magic happens."

More than just a best-selling artist, respected guitarist, expressive singer, and accomplished songwriter, Bonnie Raitt has become an institution in American music. Born to a musical family, the ten-time Grammy winner, who Rolling Stone named as both one of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time" and one of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time," is the daughter of celebrated Broadway singer John Raitt ('Carousel', 'Oklahoma!', 'The Pajama Game') and accomplished pianist/singer Marge Goddard. She was raised in Los Angeles in a climate of respect for the arts, Quaker traditions, and a commitment to social activism. A Stella guitar given to her as a Christmas present launched Bonnie on her creative journey at the age of eight. While growing up, though passionate about music from the start, she never considered that it would play a greater role than as one of her many growing interests.

In the late '60s, restless in Los Angeles, she moved east to Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a Harvard/Radcliffe student majoring in Social Relations and African Studies, she attended classes and immersed herself in the city's turbulent cultural and political activities. "I couldn't wait to get back to where there were folkies and the antiwar and civil rights movements," she says. "There were so many great music and political scenes going on in the late '60s in Cambridge." Also, she adds, with a laugh, "the ratio of guys to girls at Harvard was four to one, so all of those things were playing in my mind."

Raitt was already deeply involved with folk music and the blues at that time. Exposure to the album 'Blues at Newport 1963' at age 14 had kindled her interest in blues and slide guitar, and between classes at Harvard she explored these and other styles in local coffeehouse gigs. Three years after entering college, Bonnie left to commit herself full-time to music, and shortly afterward found herself opening for surviving giants of the blues. From Mississippi Fred McDowell, Sippie Wallace, Son House, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker she learned first-hand lessons of life, as well as invaluable techniques of performance.

"I'm certain that it was an incredible gift for me to not only be friends with some of the greatest blues people who've ever lived, but to learn how they played, how they sang, how they lived their lives, ran their marriages, and talked to their kids," she says. "I was especially lucky as so many of them are no longer with us."

Word spread quickly of the young red-haired blueswoman, her soulful, unaffected way of singing, and her uncanny insights into blues guitar. Warner Bros. tracked her down, signed her up, and in 1971 released her debut album, 'Bonnie Raitt'. Her interpretations of classic blues by Robert Johnson and Sippie Wallace made a powerful critical impression, but the presence of intriguing tunes by contemporary songwriters, as well as several examples of her own writing, indicated that this artist would not be restricted to any one pigeonhole or style.

Over the next seven years she would record six albums. 'Give It Up', 'Takin' My Time', 'Streetlights', and 'Home Plate' were followed in 1977 by 'Sweet Forgiveness', which featured her first hit single, a gritty Memphis/R&B arrangement of Del Shannon's "Runaway." Three Grammy nominations followed in the 1980s, as she released 'The Glow', 'Green Light', and 'Nine Lives'. A compilation of highlights from these Warner Bros. albums (plus two previously unreleased live duets) was released as 'The Bonnie Raitt Collection' in 1990. All of these Warner albums have been digitally remastered and re-released. In between sessions, when not burning highways on tour with her band, she devoted herself to playing benefits and speaking out in support of an array of worthy causes, campaigning to stop the war in Central America; participating in the Sun City anti-apartheid project; performing at the historic 1980 No Nukes concerts at Madison Square Garden; co-founding MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy); and working for environmental protection and for the rights of women and Native Americans.

After forging an alliance with Capitol Records in 1989, Bonnie achieved new levels of popular and critical acclaim. She won four Grammy Awards in 1990—three for her 'Nick of Time' album and one for her duet with John Lee Hooker on his breakthrough album 'The Healer'. Within weeks, 'Nick of Time' shot to number one (it is now certified quintuple platinum). 'Luck of the Draw' (1991, seven-times platinum) brought even more success, firing two hit singles—"Something to Talk About" and "I Can't Make You Love Me"—up the charts, and adding three more Grammys to her shelf. The double-platinum 'Longing in Their Hearts', released in 1994, featured the hit single "Love Sneakin' Up On You" and was honored with a Grammy for Best Pop Album. It was followed in 1995 by the live double-CD and film 'Road Tested' (now available on DVD). Along with her own set, it features duets with Bryan Adams, Jackson Browne, Bruce Hornsby, Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, and Kim Wilson.

After all the awards and honors and decades of virtually non-stop touring under her belt, Bonnie continued her activism and guesting on numerous friends' records, including Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, Keb' Mo, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and Bruce Cockburn, as well as tribute records for Richard Thompson, Lowell George, and Pete Seeger. She picked up another Grammy in 1996 for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for her collaboration on "SRV Shuffle" from the all-star 'Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan', and continued her "dual career," performing with her father, John, in concerts as well as on his Grammy-nominated album, 'Broadway Legend', released in 1995.

In 1998, she returned to the studio with a new collaborative team to create Fundamental, one of her most exploratory projects, signaling her growing desire to "shake things up a bit." Inspired by the music of Zimbabwean world-beat master Oliver Mtukudzi, Bonnie wrote "One Belief Away," the first single, with Paul Brady and Dillon O'Brian.

In March of 2000, Bonnie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; this was followed by her welcome into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, along with her father, in June 2001.

After the Fundamental tour, she went back into the studio with her veteran road band to record 'Silver Lining', released in 2002. Featuring Bonnie's stunning interpretation of the David Gray-penned title track, the Grammy-nominated "Gnawin' On It," and the hit single "I Can't Help You Now," 'Silver Lining' was considered by many critics to be one of the best albums of her career. She promoted the album with a lengthy world tour that included her Green Highway Festival and an eco-partnership promoting BioDiesel fuel, the environment, and alternative energy solutions at shows and benefits along the way. In 2003, she released the retrospective 'The Best of Bonnie Raitt' on Capitol.

Raitt stayed busy with more guest appearances, including the stunning duet "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on Ray Charles' final release 'Genius Loves Company', which won the Grammy award for Album of the Year, and a duet on the Grammy-winning album 'True Love' by Toots & The Maytals. Her 1989 breakthrough album 'Nick of Time', was remixed for surround sound, and released by Capitol Records in 2004 as a DVD-Audio, garnering a Grammy nomination in the newly created category, Best Surround Sound Album.

In 2003, she also participated in Martin Scorsese's acclaimed PBS series, 'The Blue's, performing two songs in Wim Wenders' film, 'The Soul of a Man', and joining the all-star cast of 'Lightning in a Bottle', the live feature concert film on the Blues directed by Antoine Fuqua. She also contributed songs for two Disney movies, 'The Country Bears' and 'Home on the Range'. She played guitar on a track on Stevie Wonder's album 'A Time To Love', and appeared in the TV/DVD tribute 'Music l0l: Al Green'.

'Souls Alike', her first album ever to bear the credit "Produced by Bonnie Raitt," debuted at #19 on the Billboard 200 in September 2005, eliciting widespread critical acclaim and propelling Raitt back onto the road. She was also selected as the inaugural artist for the VH1 'Classic Decades Rock Live!' CD/DVD series. 'Bonnie Raitt and Friends' featuring Norah Jones, Ben Harper, Alison Krauss and Keb' Mo' was released in August of 2006.

In the years in and around the release of 'Souls Alike', she co-headlined with Jackson Browne and Keb Mo' part of the historic "Vote For Change" tour leading up to the 2004 Presidential election, and then again for the 2008 election, staged a series of benefit concerts and fundraising receptions to help get out the vote and encourage voting in key Democratic Senate races. In 2007, Bonnie joined her MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) friends Jackson Browne and Graham Nash to launch a campaign to prevent the legislative bailout of the nuclear industry and developed, a website that serves as an information and networking hub for safe energy activists. In August 2011, MUSE mounted a very successful benefit concert at Shoreline Amphitheatre to raise funds for Japan disaster relief (following the devastating earthquake, tsunami and meltdown of the Daichi-Fukushima nuclear reactors earlier in the year), as well as non-nuclear organizations worldwide.

Bonnie continues to use her influence to affect the way music is perceived and appreciated in the world. In 1988, she was one of the co-founders of the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, which works to improve royalties, financial conditions, and recognition for a whole generation of R&B pioneers to whom she feels we owe so much. In 1995, she initiated the Bonnie Raitt Guitar Project with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, currently running in 200 clubs around the world, to encourage underprivileged youth to play music as budgets for music instruction in the schools run dry. Bonnie currently sits on the Advisory or Honorary Boards of a number of organizations, including Little Kids Rock, Rainforest Action Network, Music Maker Relief Foundation, and the Arhoolie Foundation.

Her commitment to the redemptive power of music is expressed in the foreword she wrote to 'American Roots', the book based on 2001's PBS series of the same name. "I feel strongly that this appreciation needs to be out there so that black, Latino and all kids can understand the roots of their own musical heritage," she explains. "The consolidation of the music business has made it difficult to encourage styles like the blues, all of which deserve to be celebrated as part of our most treasured national resources."

The years before and after 'Souls Alike' weren't an easy time for Raitt, with the passing of parents, her brother, and a best friend. So after following that album with her usual long run of touring—winding up with the "dream come true" of the "BonTaj Roulet" collaborative, R&B-style revue with Taj Mahal in 2009 (which raised over $200,000 for charity) and a triumphant appearance at the all-star Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th anniversary concerts the same year—she decided to step back and recharge for a while. Excited to have time at home and with her family and friends, she explored different kinds of music as a listener, while continuing her ongoing political work, helping to organize and supporting her favorite non-profit organizations.

When she returned to the studio—first in a series of sessions with producer Joe Henry and then serving as producer herself—the result was the triumphant 'Slipstream'. After spending her career split between Warner Bros and Capitol Records, she ventured out on her own with a label called Redwing Records. Raitt notes that, more than anything, what struck her about the reaction she received when she returned to the stage was the range and diversity of her audience. "My fans stay loyal and stand up and cheer and love 'Angel from Montgomery,' but I feel like we built a whole new audience with the younger Americana generation," she says. "It's very gratifying to know that there's some traction there—that it wasn't just a couple of songs on the radio around 'Nick of Time' or 'Something to Talk About' or 'I Can't Make You Love Me.' What's going on with music now, in terms of roots music, is the harvest of what we did in the '60s and '70s. It's thrilling to be around at this time. I feel part of a continuum."

Bonnie has participated as a special guest on over 185 outside projects over the years, including work with friends, on soundtracks, and for special benefit albums. Among the highlights are duets with John Lee Hooker, B.B. King, John Raitt, Aretha Franklin, Willie Nelson, Tony Bennett, and Ray Charles. (For a complete list of recorded collaborations, please visit Bonnie's Guest Discography)

With the release of 'Dig In Deep', Bonnie Raitt continues to personify what it means to stay creative, adventurous, and daring over the course of a legendary career. "I'm feeling pretty charged, and the band and I are at the top of our game," she says. "This period of my life is more exciting and vital than I was expecting, and for that I'm really grateful. At this point, I have a lot less to prove and hey, if you're not going to 'Dig In Deep' now, what's the point?"